Book Review: Can Dreams Come True?

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Can Dreams Come True?

Written by Krysten Lindsay Hager

223 pages

Published by Clean Reads

Publication date: 20th March 2018


Summary (from Goodreads):

Cecily has always had a huge crush on singer Andrew Holiday and she wants to be an actress, so she tags along when her friend auditions for his new video. However, the director isn’t looking for an actress, but rather the girl next door—and so is Andrew. Cecily gets a part in the video and all of Andrew’s attention on the set. Her friend begins to see red and Cecily’s boyfriend is seeing green—as in major jealousy. A misunderstanding leaves Cecily and her boyfriend on the outs and Andrew hopes to pick up the pieces as he’s looking for someone more stable in his life than the models he’s dated. Soon Cecily begins to realize Andrew understands her more than her small-town boyfriend—but can her perfect love match really be her favorite rock star?


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Sometimes it feels like life is in a perfect rhythm. I don’t know if things are actually written in the stars or not, but sometimes it feels that way.

I’ve always wondered if the “destined to be together” feeling is something you know from the get-go? Or is it some mystical thing where every part of you syncs up with the other person and everything from your personality to your values and innermost truths fit together? Or does the whole soulmates and destiny thing not even exist?


This is a young-adult romance book following Cecily, a bookish, conscientious high school student who meets her biggest crush – and he seems to like her back!

Cecily is a very relatable character as she worries about not fitting in and has had problems making new friends after her best friend moved away. She and her first boyfriend, Zach, are developing a strong relationship although they have problems with trusting each other because Zach is still friends with his ex, Tanna, who cheated on him. Zach finds it hard to deal with Cecily being chosen for the music video with her celebrity crush, Andrew, particularly when it seems like Andrew might actually like Cecily as more than just another fan.

I didn’t like how so many of the girls around Cecily were cruel and self-serving, although I am sure this does reflect what many people experience in high school. Cecily doubted Lila straightaway after she was accused of being out for her own gain, despite the fact that they had been friends for years. I would have liked to have seen more of Allie and I would have liked to see more of the friendship between the girls when they are talking about something else other than boys!

As a romance, the focus remained mostly on Cecily, Andrea and Zach, although I would really have liked to hear more about Zach’s mum and the problems his family were having as they seemed rather glossed over. This book raised a lot of questions for me as we were given a tantalising glimpse of further depth in each character, but the focus of the story came back to romance. I would really like to see how these stories are developed in future books.


I think people probably relate to your music because they have felt the same way and maybe it makes them feel less alone,” I said and then stared down at my hands hoping I hadn’t revealed my lonely, loser childhood to him. It had never occurred to me before that the reason I experienced that connection to him was because he was writing about loneliness and isolation. Suddenly a lot of my interest in him was making more sense, but I wasn’t sure I liked what it said about me. Sure, I knew I always seemed as if I was on the outside looking in and like I didn’t fit in, but this was confirmation of it.


What I liked: A lot of teenagers will be able to relate to the main character, such as when she thinks of the perfect comeback several hours after she has been insulted, but doesn’t have the guts to follow through and say it the next day. I liked how it showed some of the negative sides of fame e.g. Andrew being busy on the phone when he was meant to be with Cecily, his past girlfriends being insulted by fans or dragged through the mud in the media. I liked how Cecily’s parents are present and active in being involved in their daughter’s life – often there is a trend in YA of parents being absent or unaware.

Even better if: A more detailed editing might have picked up on  few misused/ misspelled words. At times, Cecily’s worries felt a bit repetitive. The book ended quite abruptly, i felt, but I can see that this is the first book in a series so I imagine that any loose threads will be tied up there.

How you could use it in your classroom: This would be enjoyed by teenagers who are already fans of romance or are looking to find reassurance that they are not alone in feeling awkward and like they don’t really fit in. As a book published by clean reads, there is no sexual content or anything that would make this unsuitable for younger readers even though the protagonist is in her late teens.


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Find the author on:

Goodreads * Website * Instagram* Twitter* Facebook *Pinterest* Amazon

Buy a copy of the book on Amazon UK * Amazon USA


Thank you to the author for letting me read an e-ARC for the purposes of his blog tour. This blog blitz is hosted by Jenny from Neverland Blog Tours

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Find me on Twitter or Goodreads


Giveaway – win a £5 (or equivalent in dollars) Amazon Gift Card here

3 Comments Add yours

  1. Krysten says:

    Thank you for reading and reviewing Can Dreams Come True!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for letting me read a copy! 🙂

      Like

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